Source of Supply

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The City's water system currently consists of four pump stations, two storage reservoirs, one elevated storage tank, two water supply wells and approximately 112 miles of water distribution pipelines.  There are currently thrWater Source of Supplyee available water supply sources: (1) Metropolitan Water District-treated surface water provided by the West Basin Municipal Water District; (2) groundwater provided by a City-owned and operated well, and (3) reclaimed water supplied for landscaping irrigation from West Basin MWD. The City obtains approximately 80 percent of its water supply from MWD surface water, 17 percent from groundwater, and three percent from recycled water. These three water sources have been, and continue to be, adequate to meet the total water demands of the City.

Recycled water costs approximately 25 percent less than fully potable water. City parks and school athletic fields are currently using recycled water.

Should the supply of imported water ever be interrupted due to disaster or system failure, the two wells, if undamaged, will provide approximately 60 - 100 percent of normal capacity for an indefinite time. (Seasonally adjusted)

Statewide Water Shortage

The Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA) is conducting an ongoing statewide public education program, entitled "California's Water: A Crisis We Can't Ignore," California's Water Crisis  to educate Californians about critical challenges now confronting the state's water supply and delivery system, including a deepening crisis in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) and a recent court-ordered massive reduction in our statewide water supply. ACWA began airing the second television advertisement in a series of ads designed to educate Californians about the state's water crisis. The 30-second ad will air statewide in all major markets in California.

ACWA began airing the second television advertisement in a series of ads designed to educate Californians about the state's water crisis. The 30-second ad will air statewide in all major markets in California. California's Water Crisis Ads.

The ad features Dr. Jeffrey Mount, Professor of Geology at the University of California, Davis. In the ad, Mount says of the state's current water system: "It could be a major storm. It could be a major earthquake. It could be a major drought. This water supply infrastructure is so fragile at this point, it's undoubtedly going to break sometime in the future."