Clean Power Alliance

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UPDATE 12-3-18:

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 All residential power customers in MB will have 50% of their energy coming from clean, renewable sources at a competitive rate starting in February 2019 through Clean Power Alliance!

 

We are excited to announce that our community will soon enjoy the advantages of clean, renewable power at competitive rates! Starting in February 2019 for residential customers and May 2019 for non-residential customers, Clean Power Alliance will be the new electricity provider for our community.

Manhattan Beach's City Council has chosen to select the "Clean Power" tier as the default option for our community, which provides 50% renewable content and the opportunity to support building a cleaner future. This option will be the default selection for both our residents and businesses.

The best part of our City's participation in Clean Power Alliance is: the choice is yours! If Clean Power is not the right fit for you, your family, or your business, you can change your service by selecting one of Clean Power Alliance’s other two rate options: Lean Power, which provides 36% renewable content at the lowest possible cost, and 100% Green Power, which provides 100% renewable content and gives customers the opportunity to be an environmental champion.  You may also choose to opt-out of the service. For more information visit www.cleanpoweralliance.org or contact Clean Power Alliance at customerservice@cleanpoweralliance.org or 888-585-3788.

Clean Power Alliance offers three rate options designed to suit the diverse needs of our community:

Lean Power

Clean Power

100% Green Power

Provides 36% renewable content at the lowest possible cost—with the added benefit of local management and control. Our community has selected Lean Power as our default option.

Learn more.

Provides 50% renewable content and the opportunity to support building a cleaner future, all at cost competitive rates.

Learn more.

Provides 100% renewable content and gives you the opportunity to be an environmental champion—leading the way to a greener future.

Learn more.

No matter what offering you choose, our community will soon enjoy the shared benefits of Clean Power Alliance including:

●      Local Management & Control

●      Stable, Competitive Rates

●      Higher Renewable Content

What is Clean Power Alliance?

Clean Power Alliance is a nonprofit entity, formed through a Joint Powers Authority (JPA) made up of 31 public agencies across Los Angeles and Ventura counties—including Manhattan Beach, working together to bring clean, renewable power choices to our communities.

In December 2017, the City of Manhattan Beach voted to join Clean Power Alliance to bring the power of choice to our community. Mayor Steve Napolitano represents Manhattan Beach on the Clean Power Alliance Board of Directors, with Mayor Pro Tem Nancy Hersman and Environmental Manager Dana Murray as alternate Board Directors for Manhattan Beach.

How does it work?

Webpage_HowItWorksClean Power Alliance will purchase clean power and Southern California Edison (SCE) will deliver it.

Nothing else changes—SCE will continue to deliver power to your home or business, send one bill, and be responsible for resolving any issues with your electricity service.

What changes and what stays the same?

Webpage_WhatChangesTable

What comes next?

As Clean Power Alliance begins to offer service, customers will receive a total of four notices via mail before and after the switch from SCE to Clean Power Alliance. The first notice is scheduled to be distributed in December 2018. You don’t have to do anything when you receive these notices; you will automatically begin receiving the benefits of Clean Power Alliance service in 2019. However, the notices will give you information about your new energy choices, including how to make changes to your account and customer support contact information.

Once you receive your first notice, you can also choose not to take advantage of all the benefits Clean Power Alliance has to offer and elect to opt out without penalty, and your electricity generating charges will remain with SCE—but we hope you will join us in enjoying the advantages of clean, renewable power at competitive rates! 

To learn more, including frequently asked questions and rate comparisons, visit the Clean Power Alliance website at cleanpoweralliance.org.

UPDATE 2-14-18:

In December 2017, the City of Manhattan Beach joined the Clean Power Alliance of Southern California (CPA), formerly known as the Los Angeles Community Choice Energy Program (LACCE), which includes 25 member cities and two counties. By virtue of City membership in the Alliance, the City of Manhattan Beach’s residents and businesses are automatically enrolled in the Clean Power Alliance; however, residents can opt out of the program and return to receiving power generated from Southern California Edison’s (SCE) investor-owned utility, rather than community choice energy, at any time. Residents and businesses in the City will be legally noticed in late 2018 as to when our energy will be procured by the Clean Power Alliance. Please see Clean Power Alliance's Frequently Asked Questions.

Within the Clean Power Alliance structure, each individual city and county member has the authority to set the default renewable energy tier that will be offered to residents and businesses within their jurisdiction. The method by which each member makes this determination is entirely within their own agency’s purview as there are no legal requirements governing this selection. At the Clean Power Alliance’s February 1, 2018 Board meeting, Clean Power Alliance staff asked members (including Manhattan Beach) to make their final selection by March 1, 2018. In February 2018, the Manhattan Beach City Council voted 5-0 to default the City and power customers in the City at the 50% renewable energy rate to achieve competitive rates at a higher renewable percentage.

UPDATE 12-19-17: 

The City of Manhattan Beach has joined the Los Angeles Community Choice Energy Program (LACCE), which includes 25 member cities and two counties. For more information: LACCE Overview

Joining LACCE will shift more of the City's utility source generation to clean renewable energy, thereby reducing its overall greenhouse gas emissions and better position the City to achieve renewable energy goals. It will allow Manhattan Beach to join other regional jurisdictions in helping the State achieve its goals to power 50 percent of the state's electricity consumption using renewable energy by 2030 and help lessen the public health impacts of air pollution.

The date that the Clean Power Alliance begins actually purchasing power will depend on the California Public Utilities Commission's (CPUC) acceptance of the LACCE Implementation Plan and the time needed for Southern California Edison to transfer its customer accounts to LACCE. LA County anticipates that a phased rollout will occur in the first half of 2018, with priority given to municipal members and followed by large commercial and industrial facilities, and finally to all other LACCE customers (such as Manhattan Beach residents). The City of Manhattan Beach’s residents and businesses are automatically enrolled in LACCE; however, residents can opt out of the program and return to receiving power generated from SCE’s portfolio at any time. Residents and businesses in the City will be legally noticed in the first half of 2018 as to when our energy will be procured by LACCE.

Manhattan Beach’s Mayor, Mayor Pro Tem, and Environmental Manager attend LACCE negotiation meetings and contribute their perspectives on the Board of Directors.

LACCE FAQ

What is Community Choice Energy?

Community Choice Energy, also known as Community Choice Aggregation (CCE or CCA), is an association of local governments who decide to procure electrcity themselves instead of buying power from the local utlity. Forming a CCA allows a city to advance sustainability goals by buying more renewable power than the utlity standard, saves residents on their monthly bill with lower rates, and creates local jobs. Successful CCA's such as Marin Clean Energy and Sonoma Clean Power provide 50% renewable energy at a rate 4-5% lower than the utility. California Assembly Bill 117 passed in 2002, and established the ability for local governments to form a non-profit Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) organization (also known as Community Choice Energy) to purchase electricity from power producers for sale to their constituents. More than 90 cities and counties in California have already joined seven CCAs. A CCA:

  • Negotiates wholesale rates for electricity through contracts with power producers.
  • Takes control of decision making regarding sources of electrical power to achieve sustainability goals, such as the reduction of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions.
  • Provides customers with an alternative to Southern California Edison (SCE) when selecting their electricity provider.
  • Sets customer rates that may be lower than SCE.
  • Develops energy programs to achieve their objectives.

Participation in LACCE supports the City’s Strategic Goal to “Enhance, Preserve, and Protect the Environment and Health of Our Beach Community.” The City has a goal to reduce its GHG emissions, and a long history of supporting efforts that lead to climate protection. Community Choice is a tool local government can use to meet GHG emissions reduction goals. Further, joining LACCE gives our City an opportunity to offer its citizens a renewable alternative to meet their electricity needs.

Get Involved!

Members of the public are invited to attend a workshop on Wednesday, January 10 at 6:30 pm at the Duarte Community Center (1600 E. Huntington Dr.) to learn more about the LACCE program and provide input on the formation of a Community Advisory Committee to help inform the work of LACCE. The public may also attend via webinar or phone - find the information at http://lacce.org/

City Action

On June 17, 2014 City Council voted to oppose AB 2145 because the legislation would make it difficult for local governments to pursue Community Choice energy programs as an alternative to traditional utility power generation. The City of Manhattan Beach sent an additional opposition letter in August 2014, stating its continued opposition to AB 2145 and its amendments. The proposed bill did not pass, and the original legislation enacting Community Choice programs remains in place.

In 2014, the City held a forum discussion for Earth Hour at which CCA was discussed in a presentation by Cordel Stillman - Deputy Chief Engineer of the Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA).

On October 21, 2014, the City Council unanimously adopted a resolution to authorize staff to participate in the pre-development exploration and feasibility phase of Community Choice Aggregation in Manhattan Beach.

In September 2016, the LA County Board of Supervisors approved a motion to conduct  negotiations with interested cities to form a LACCE Joint Powers Agreement (JPA). The LACCE JPA will govern, operate, and be liable for the LACCE program. It will have its own staff and will report to a board of directors made up of representative members of the JPA. Cities have a 180-day window (June 27 through December 27, 2017) to join the JPA and secure their own enabling CCA ordinance. Those cities that do not meet the deadline may still join at a later date, but will not have the same membership privileges that cites who meet the deadline will have, and may pay an entry fee to join.

On October 3, 2017, City Council received a status update on CCA programs the City Council directed staff to bring back an enabling ordinance to implement a CCA, to approve the Joint Powers Agreement to join LACCE and to appoint a City Council Member and up to two alternates to serve on the LACCE Board on behalf of the City.

On December 5, 2017, City Council introduced an enabling ordinance to implement a CCA in Manhattan Beach and authorized the Mayor to execute a Joint Powers Agreement to join the Los Angeles Community Choice Energy Authority (LACCE). Later that evening, the Mayor, with the concurrence of the City Council, appointed Mayor Amy Howorth as board director and Mayor Pro Tem Steve Napolitano as the Primary Alternate. Environmental Manager Dana Murray is the second alternate.